Social Mobility and How Access to the Professions can be Improved: is employer outreach part of the solution?

Earning differences between graduates from lower and higher socio-economic backgrounds are as high as 10 per cent according to research (Britton et al., 2016; Crawford and Erve, 2015). Reasons for this disparity are multifaceted and complex; including an inability to engage with extracurricular and developmental activities, lack of confidence when career planning, and discrimination from … Continue reading Social Mobility and How Access to the Professions can be Improved: is employer outreach part of the solution?

Welfare conditionality and benefit sanctions: a system ‘of conscious cruelty’?

In 1966, Ken Loach's seminal film Cathy Come Home brought the problem of homelessness to the public consciousness, dislodging stereotyped assumptions about homeless people.  In 2016 he did the same for benefit claimants, another vilified group, with his film  I Daniel Blake.   In 2012 the Coalition Government introduced the harshest regime of benefit sanctions … Continue reading Welfare conditionality and benefit sanctions: a system ‘of conscious cruelty’?

Social Prescribing: shiny new policy thing or something more important?

By Chris Dayson, Principal Research Fellow at Sheffield Hallam University Social prescribing is a current UK policy phenomenon. If your local area hasn't 'got it' already you can bet someone will be doing their level best to get it up and running sooner rather than later. But what is it and what does mean for … Continue reading Social Prescribing: shiny new policy thing or something more important?

Evidence driven policy, welfare cuts and our customers

It’s Thursday, 26 October. It is the morning after the night before. Yesterday, the Prime Minister announced that the Government’s proposal to apply the Local Housing Allowance Cap to care and supported housing tenants was to be dropped. This reckless measure, first announced by George Osborne in November 2015, has threatened to wipe out new supported housing schemes across the country, and many services were threatened with closure. The announcement was greeted in our office with SYHA people clapping, hugging, dancing and even crying. The collective, audible sigh of relief at our Board meeting later in the afternoon could have been heard in Downing Street.

The Destructive Cycle of Recurrent Care Proceedings

We know that 'looked after children' face a higher level of disadvantage for example they are more likely to become homeless and have subsequent contact with the criminal justice system, but what is the fate of their parents? It seems logical that in addressing the number of children entering and re-entering care we need to look firstly to the parents from whom children are removed.

The ‘do it yourself’ future of social care

Social care unintentionally became a key election issue for the Conservatives through the inclusion in their manifesto of what MP Nigel Evans referred to as 'a full frontal assault on our core voters - the elderly'. The party had previously committed themselves to a new green paper, but care minister David Mowat has lost his Warrington South seat, and his role has not yet been filled in the cabinet reshuffle. The future of social care under a minority Conservative government is uncertain.