People, Place and Policy: Conference Report 2018

The fourth ‘People, Place and Policy Conference’ was held at Collegiate Crescent Campus on 27th June.  This year’s interdisciplinary theme of ‘alternative urban futures for tackling social and spatial inequalities’ attracted attendees from across the social sciences. In an opening keynote, Guy Standing set the tone for the conference with a summary of his concept … Continue reading People, Place and Policy: Conference Report 2018

Why was it England that voted for Brexit?

By John Denham Political scientists have given us a wealth of regression analysis linking the Brexit vote to age, education, long-term economic decline, social values and attitudes towards immigration. Valuable though those insights are, the different paths of the different parts of the United Kingdom suggest that something else was going on as well. It … Continue reading Why was it England that voted for Brexit?

Four years on: The postcode lottery of Clare’s Law

Jamie Grace, SIPS Fellow, Senior Lecturer in Law, Sheffield Hallam University j.grace@shu.ac.uk and @HumanRightsHKC Introduction The recently-publicised and awful crimes of both Theodore Johnson (a killer of three women in successive relationships across more than 35 years) and Marvyn Iheanacho (who killed his partner's 5-year old son having previously attacked a child) have recently led … Continue reading Four years on: The postcode lottery of Clare’s Law

Why the phrase ‘LGBT Community’ is problematic

By Eleanor Formby How often have you heard someone talk about ‘the heterosexual community’? Rarely or never, I would guess, but the term ‘LGBT community’ is frequently used by policy-makers, service providers, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) people themselves. So what understandings and experiences does that phrase conjure up – or ignore? I … Continue reading Why the phrase ‘LGBT Community’ is problematic